Bagaimana Anda membungkus sebuah produk

Ada sedikitnya tiga cara bagi sebuah perusahaan untuk membungkus (package) produk yang dijualnya. Pertama, tidak perlu bungkus apa-apa, cukup barangnya saja. Kedua, ada bungkus biasa, standar, hanya untuk menjawab tujuan pragmatis demi penampilan luar dan perlindungan dasar. Ketiga, Anda membungkus produk untuk membangkitkan gelora konsumen dalam menggunakan produk Anda.

Mari belajar dari Apple. Continue reading “Bagaimana Anda membungkus sebuah produk”

Never been this excited for iOS!

I have always been excited every time Apple releases a new edition of its mobile operating system, iOS. In every iteration, iOS brings many improvements, and still a very trustworthy system to be used everyday. Remember the first time iOS was released for iPhone? Yes. The first time it was released for iPod touch? Updated straight away (despite the USD 9.99 upgrade fee). Released for the iPad in 2010? I still remember that. Or the crazy design overhaul through iOS 7? (“We have ran out of green felt!”)

I think, however, iOS 11 will be the most exciting release, ever. I have never been this excited.

This is the release for the iPad, and Apple actually shows that it cares for the iPad and its users. It may have taken too long for Apple to make the iOS right for the iPad, but if it takes that long, I believe it is worth the months and years passing, hoping that finally Apple gets it right.

From drag and drop, the persistent (albeit hidden) dock, revamped control center, and even a new Files app mechanism, I have every reason to celebrate the release, and finally to ponder if the iPad Pro is a worthy way to replace my 9-year old MacBook.

I was on the fence before between iPad Pro and a certain tablet that runs a full-blown computer operating system. Sorry, that-other-tablet-device, your product is lovely and all that, but I am swaying, again, for a product that I can actually trust. time after time, after time again.

Let’s wait for iOS 11 to be released publicly, and have productivity accelerating to a whole new level!

The update

iOS 10 is finally here, and I have to admit, this is the release that I’ve been expecting the most—even more than iOS7, and I am truly satisfied. This is perhaps the first major upgrade of iOS that feels logical. It tidies things, refine the smallest of details, and small but surely, improves my workflow as well. 

I definitely cannot get those who label this update sucks, or not revolutionary. Sure, Apple is a revolutionary company in itself, but changes for the better need not always come in giant leaps. Sometimes, smaller refinements are what we actually need, and I believe iOS 10 makes the “most advanced mobile operating system” to become more polished, and again I say logical, purposeful, and you know it just by feeling it—even I cannot elaborate why do I think this way. 

If this is a good sign for many things to come, boy, I can’t wait!

Misunderstanding Steve (Or: Steve Would Be Happy with Apple Pencil)

Cue the ‘who wants a stylus?’ meme.

Yesterday, Apple held a keynote to launch new iterations to three of its product lines: the iPhone (the new 6s and 6s+), the iPad (the new iPad Pro), and also the newest Apple TV. While generally liked (I like them, mostly), controversies just bound to happen. Continue reading “Misunderstanding Steve (Or: Steve Would Be Happy with Apple Pencil)”

Jony Ive on Design [Quote]

As industrial designers we no longer design objects. We design the user’s perceptions of what those objects are, as well as the meaning that accrues from their physical existence, their function and the sense of possibility they offer. […] It’s also very inhuman and very cold. Because of the industry’s obsession with absolutes, there has been a tendency to ignore product attributes that are difficult to measure or talk about. In that sense, the industry has missed out on the more emotive, less tangible product attributes. But to me, that is why I bought an Apple computer in the first place. That is why I came to work for Apple. It’s because I’ve always sensed that Apple has a desire to do more than the bare minimum. It wasn’t just going to do what was functionally and empirically necessary. In the early stuff, I got a sense that care was taken even on details, hard and soft, that people may never discover.

– Sir Jonathan Ive, SVP of Design, Apple

The Cook Doctrine

There is extraordinary breadth and depth and tenure among the Apple executive team. We believe that we are on the face of the earth to make great products and that’s not changing. We are constantly focusing on innovating. We believe in the simple not the complex. We believe that we need to own and control the primary technologies behind the products that we make, and participate only in markets where we can make a significant contribution. We believe in saying no to thousands of projects so that we can really focus on the few that are truly important and meaningful to us. We believe in deep collaboration and cross-pollination of our groups which allows us to innovate in a way that others cannot. We have the self-honesty to admit when we’re wrong  and the courage to change. And I think regardless of who is in what job those values are so embedded in this company that Apple will do extremely well.

Tim Cook, CEO of Apple Inc.

Why iPod Classic (after all these years)?

Ah, the iPod Classic. Its spinning hard drive, its bulkier form factor, its sometimes slow performance, its 20-minute skip protection, the debate about the sound chips, its capability to take your entire music library with you. The good ol’ faithful iPod Classic. Haven’t been updated since 2009 (upgrading the storage from 120GB to 160GB), many people predict the demise of this lovely device, especially due to the popularity of iPod Touch and the slump of iPod sales in general. Practically the last 30-pin connector device still left on the market (besides the old iPhones and other iPods of course), we can expect Apple to pull the plug real soon.

Continue reading “Why iPod Classic (after all these years)?”